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Guidon de cavalerie

 
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The Spy
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PostPosted: Sun 16 May - 14:45 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
.

Qui peut nous parler de ce guidon ?
quelle différence entre celui-ci et ceux ressemblant à celui-là  ------->    ?
Pourquoi la lettre A ?




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PostPosted: Sun 16 May - 15:31 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

selon les Règlements chaque régiment aura un "standard" (drapeau national) en soie avec le numéro de l'unité et chaque compagnie un guidon en soie

en fait, le guidon rouge et blanc est celui décrit par les règlements pour l'Armée et il porte la lettre de compagnie

pour la Guerre Civile comme nous avons aussi des régiments de volontaires, certaines libertés sont prises par rapport à ces règlements: d'où le guidon aux couleurs nationales et avec la lettre de compagnie
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PostPosted: Sun 16 May - 15:43 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote



de haut en bas:

"standard" du 2nd US Cavalry, qui servira de modèle pour le drapeau réglementaire

"guidon" du 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Compagnie I, tel qu'autorisé à partir de Janvier 1862

"guidon" du 1st Vermont Cavalry, Compagnie C, du début de guerre, par rapport aux Règlements de 1861, les inscriptions devraient être inversées, lettre de compagnie sur le fond blanc
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"Put the Vermonters ahead and keep the column well close"
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Captain Nathan BRITTLES
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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 11:31 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

SUPERBE PHOTOS DU DRAPEAU DU SECOND U.S. CAVALRY !!!
Mon régiement de prédilection !!!!!

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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 13:32 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

et ça ?
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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 13:48 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

ce guidon était porté par les Cleveland Guards, connus officiellement sous le nom de Compagnie L (voilà pour le L central) du 1st Rhode Island Cavalry (voilà pour le R et le I)
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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 13:52 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

ne commencez pas à sortir tous les trucs improbables que l'on peut trouver sur la toile (je plaisante)

sinon je peux vous en mettre des dizaines avec des bizarres ou des magnifiques 
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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 14:37 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

un exemple des différents "design" rien que pour le "National Flag"



The 33-Star Flag

United States of America 1859-1861
The 33rd state to join the union was Oregon in 1859. This was our Flag for the next two years under Presidents James Buchanan (1857-1861) and Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865). At the outbreak of the Civil War (1861), President Lincoln refused to remove the stars representing those states which seceded from the Union.




The 33-Star "Great Star" Flag

The 33-Star Great Star Design
Although never an official version of the United States flag, this very popular variant design was proudly displayed by many patriotic Americans. It was never officially used by the military or any government organization.
It should be noted here that Congress had never made any regulation about what type of star pattern should be used on the "official" United States flag. Therefore, any pattern was acceptable. The Navy regulated the star pattern on their "boat" flags to horizontal rows, but the Army and civil government did not. This explains the many different star patterns.


The Ft. Sumter Flag

The Fort Sumter Flag 1861
The 33-Star garrison flag that flew over Fort Sumter is sometimes called "the flag that started a war." The fort's commander was Major Anderson when the first shots of the American Civil War were fired in Charleston harbor. He surrendered to the Southern forces under General Beauregard after three days of token resistance. The only two casualties of the fighting were two Confederate privates killed when their cannon accidentally exploded.
Ever since the Mexican-American War (about 1845) the Army had followed an unofficial tradition of using a "diamond" pattern for the stars on their garrison flags. The Fort Sumter flag is a good example of this practice.


The 34-Star Flag

United States of America 1861-1863
In the first 3 months of the war a star was added when Kansas joined the Union in 1861. It remained our Flag for the next two years. President Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865) was the only President to serve under this flag as the Civil War raged.


The 34-Star "Great Star" Flag

The 34-Star Great Star Design
Although this variant design was never an official version of the United States flag, it was very popular with many Americans. It was never officially used by the military or any government organization.


34-Star Flag

The 34-Star Cluster Design
This clever variant had five clusters of six stars each with the final four stars being centered on the top, sides and bottom. The five clusters of stars form a Saint Andrew's Cross and the four single stars form a Saint George's Cross. Because of this, this design was also called the "Great Cross" Flag.


34-Star Round

United States of America 1961-1863
These national presentation colors were manufactured by the Evans & Hassall Company of Philadelphia for all the Union New Jersey regiments after 1863.


The 35-Star Flag

United States of America (1863-1865)
This flag became our flag when West Virginia separated from Virginia to join the Union in 1863. It remained our flag until the close of the Civil War. Presidents Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865) and Andrew Johnson (1865-1869) served under this flag.

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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 14:42 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

encore une autre version


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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 14:46 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

d'autres guidons de commandement



Union Cavalry Guidon

Union Cavalry Guidon
This is the regulation cavalry guidon that was carried by mounted Union troops in the Civil War. It usually would be "customized" by placing a troop letter or other designator inside the circle of golden stars.
The U.S. Cavalry later used guidons in the Plains Indian Wars. In fact, the cavalry was the last of the three branches of service of the U.S. Army to carry the Stars and Stripes into battle. This was also one of the three flags that Colonel George A. Custer and the Seventh Cavalry carried at the Battle of Little Big Horn.


General Custer's HQ Flag

General Custer's HQ Flag
In the Army of the Potomac, the Cavalry Corps used a swallow-tailed guidon with white crossed sabres centered over two horizontal stripes. The red over blue colors designated General George Armstrong Custer's headquarters. Custer was a Brigadier General of United States Volunteers, but only a Lieutenant Colonel in the Regular Army.


General Sheridan HQ Flag

General Sheridan HQ Flag
General Phil Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah headquarters used this swallow-tailed guidon which was horizontally divided into a red over white striped field featuring two contrasting stars in the design.


Army of the Potomac HQ Flag

Army of the Potomac HQ Flag
Major-General George Meade adopted this flag for the Army of the Potomac Headquarters. It was a swallow-tailed guidon featuring no strips, but with a golden colored eagle set within a silver wreath centered on a plain magenta field.


General Ambrose Burnsides HQ Flag

Army of the Potomac HQ Flag
Before he commanded the Army of the Potomac, the badge, anchor and cannon devices were used on General Burnsides's swallow-tailed HQ flag of the Ninth Corps. When he took command of the whole Army of the Potomac his flag devices came with him.


General Reynold's HQ Flag

Headquarters I Corps Guidon
According to General Orders 10 of the Army of the Potomac, all headquarters flags were changed to blue swallow-tailed guidons with white Maltese crosses and the corps number in red numerals in the center. John Fulton Reynolds was commander of the 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was killed at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863.

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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 15:05 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

les "Confederate Flags"



Republic of Mississippi Flag

The "Bonnie Blue" Flag
The first recorded use of the lone star flag dates back to 1810 when a troop of West Florida dragoons set out for the Spanish provincial capitol at Baton Rouge under this flag. They were joined by other republican forces and captured Baton Rouge, imprisoned the Spanish Governor and raised their Bonnie Blue flag over the Fort of Baton Rouge. Three days later the president of the West Florida Convention, signed a Declaration of Independence and the flag became the emblem of a short-lived new republic. By December the flag of the United States replaced the blue lone star flag after President Madison issued a proclamation declaring West Florida under the jurisdiction of the Governor of the Louisiana Territory. The lone star flag was used by the Republic of Texas from 1836 to 1839, and in 1861 became the first flag of the Confederacy.

The lone star flag was flown at the "Convention of the People" in Mississippi on January 9, 1861. It was later celebrated in the popular song "The Bonnie Blue Flag" (see lyrics) which was sung by southern troops on their way to battle. Although never officially one of the national flags of the Confederate States of America, it was considered one by the soldiers and southern people.


Stars and Bars (7 States)

First Confederate National Flag
(first version)

This flag was adopted, but never officially enacted. In their haste to have a flag prepared for the flag raising ceremony on March 4, 1861, the Confederate Congress neglected to formally enact a flag law. When this flag was first raised over the capitol building in Montgomery, it contained seven stars, representing the Confederate States. This was also the flag used by the Confederate Army of the Potomac under General Beauregard at the First Battle of Bull Run (First Manassas) in 1861.

Strangely enough, one of the most persistent myths about Confederate flags concerns the First National flag. This myth states that this flag only saw combat at the First Battle of Bull Run, and was then replaced by the Army of Northern Virginia Battle flag (see below). In reality, of all the types of Confederate flags, this First National Flag (and its different versions) saw more battle service than any other and was still in use at the end of the war.


Stars and Bars (11 States)

First Confederate National Flag
(second version)

Much like the flag of the United States the Confederate States added stars as they added states. By the third week of April of 1861 two more stars were added to the First National flag representing Virginia and Arkansas. By May, North Carolina was added, and by June Tennessee had joined to increase the number to eleven. The actual number of states to join the Confederacy was eleven, thus possibly making this flag the most correct, however, eventually 13 stars were added (see below).
In reality, there is really no "correct" version of this flag as it comes in the late days of Jacksonian America, most flags were hand-made, and people pretty much did what they wanted with making flags.


Stars and Bars (13 States)

First Confederate National Flag
(final version)

The First National Flag eventually had 13 stars. The admission of Kentucky and Missouri in September and December brought the circle of stars to thirteen. During battle this flag was sometimes confused with the Union Stars and Stripes, therefore it was replaced by the 2nd National flag in 1863. Although there were only 11 states in the Confederacy, there were stars added for Missouri and Kentucky because both sides claimed these states. Missouri and Kentucky actually had two state governments: the elected governments which seceded and joined the Confederate States, and provisional governments created by the Union who actually held them.
In actuality, there were multiple versions of this flag. Examples on file include those with a single star as well as these star counts - 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 , 15 and 17.


Second National Flag

Second Confederate National Flag
Although popular legend states that because the pattern and colors of the Stars and Bars flag did not distinguish it sharply from the Stars and Stripes of the Union, it sometimes led to confusion on the battlefield. So the legend states it was decided to design a new flag for the Confederate States that was in no way similar to the Union's Stars and Stripes. However, the real reason this flag was designed had nothing to do with the U.S. flag. It had more to do with the Confederate Congress seeking a more "Confederate" flag, to honor the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, and to replace the First National Flag which had split feelings in the South.

Therefore, on May 1, 1863, a second design was adopted, using the "Southern Cross" Battle Flag as the canton on a simple white field. This second design was sometimes called "the Stainless Banner" and is sometimes referred to as the "Stonewall Jackson Flag" because its first use was to cover Stonewall Jackson's coffin at his funeral. The nickname "stainless" referred to the pure white field.


Second National Flag
(possible variant)

Second Confederate National Flag (or regimental colors)
This interesting Second Confederate National Flag, with its reversed colors in the canton, was captured at the Battle of Paine's Cross Roads (Painesville) in Virginia near the end of the Civil War in 1865 by Sgt. John A. Davidsizer of the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry. This action involved the burning of Confederate supply wagons at Painesville, Virginia, and seven Medals of Honor were awarded to Union soldiers as a result of this one action.

It should noted here that the Medal of Honor was routinely awarded for capturing the rebel flag during a Civil War battle, and the possibly exists that these units simply overtook the wagons and just plundered them for the flags before burning them, as this was not a pitched battle. It is even unclear if this flag is a variant Confederate national flag; or an unidentified regimental color. It is currently housed in the collection of the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia.


Third National Flag

Third Confederate National Flag
It was soon discovered that the Second Confederate National Flag (see above) was easily mistaken for either a white flag of surrender or parlay flag, especially when the air was calm and the flag hung limply, and it was decided that this flag also had to be modified. In 1865 it was officially replaced by this Third and last Confederate National flag which had a large vertical red stripe placed along its right edge.

Although not widely used because of the rapidly approaching end of the war, the flag was reported in Richmond newspapers in December of 1864 and by January of 1865, examples of this pattern were flying over Richmond hospitals and units of the James River Squadron. Some examples were also used as unit battle flags until the South surrendered on April 9th.


Army of West Virginia
Battle Flag

Army of Northern Virginia Battle Flag
Because the colors that different commands and regiments carried on the field were a major means of identification, local commanders designed special battle flags to distinguish units during battles. The most famous of these Confederate Battle flags was that of the Army of Northern Virginia.

The famous "Southern Cross" design was born when Southern Congressman William Miles suggested the design to General Beauregard, who took it to the army's commander General Johnston. The first battle flag was made in September of 1861 by Hettie, Jennie, and Constance Cary of Richmond.


Army of the Peninsula
Battle Flag

Army of the Peninsula Battle Flag
The Confederate Army of the Peninsula was under the command of Confederate General John Magruder in the early days of the American Civil War, and it was General Magruder who ordered this flag made for his command in April of 1862.

The Army of the Peninsula fought against the invading Union Army of the Potomac, commanded by Union General John McClellan, from late 1861 until June of 1862 before being merged with the newly reorganized Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, now under the command of the legendary General Robert E. Lee.


Naval Jack until 1863

Confederate States of America First Naval Jack
The First Confederate Navy Jack consisted of a circle of seven 5-pointed white stars on a field of light blue. Since a jack is a flag that looks like the union or canton of a national flag, the first Confederate Naval Jack was a blue flag containing seven stars just like the canton on the Stars and Bars. On a sailing vessel, the jack is hoisted on the jack-staff (flag pole) on a military vessel's bow (front end) when at anchor or in port.


Naval Jack after 1863

The Second Confederate Navy Jack
The Second Naval Jack is basically a rectangular version of the "Southern Cross" as found on the canton of the second national flag. The blue color in the saltire (the diagonal cross) is much lighter than on the National Flag or the battle flag, and was flown by Confederate warships from 1863 to 1865.

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PostPosted: Mon 17 May - 15:07 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

d'autres drapeaux confédérés



First Florida Volunteer Division - 1863

First Regiment of Florida Volunteer Infantry Flag
The 1st Florida Volunteer Infantry was organized at the Chattahoochee Arsenal during March of 1861. The unit fought long and hard throughout the war and was at nearly every major battle in which the Confederate Army of Tennessee was engaged.


3rd Kentucky Mounted Infantry

3rd Kentucky Mounted Infantry Regiment Flag
The 3rd Kentucky Infantry was organized in 1861 in Tennessee. It was a part of Kentucky's "Orphan Brigade," until late 1862 when it was reassigned to the Army of Tennessee. Further research now shows that these flags were not just for the Orphan Brigade but, rather, were the battle flags of General John Breckinridge's whole division. Formerly, the Reserve Corps at Shiloh, it was the only command at the Battle of Shiloh without standardized battle flags and in May of 1862, the division adopted these flags and continued to use them into 1863.

The 3rd Regiment became mounted in 1864 and would serve in Mississippi, Georgia and Alabama. As a mounted regiment it was removed from the Army of Tennessee and remained to fight in Mississippi under Nathan Bedford Forrest. On May 4, 1865, what was left of the regiment surrendered at Meridian, Mississippi.


39th Georgia Brigade

Cummings' White Cross Battle Flag 1863
During the siege of Vicksburg, the Confederate volunteers from Georgia under the command of Brigadier General Alfred Cumming used this battle flag. It was one of the famous White Cross Battle Flags used by the Vicksburg Garrison in its struggle with the Union Army of the Tennessee of Union General U.S. Grant. This brigade was part of Carter Stevenson's Division, which probably all used similar flags, but only the flag of the 39th Georgia survives of this pattern.

The Confederate "Army of Tennessee" was named after the state, the Union "Army of the Tennessee" was named after the river, much to the confusion of history students ever since.


Missouri Raid Battle Flag

Bowen's White Cross Battle Flag 1863
General John Bowen's command established a distinguished combat record as a fighting division of the Army of the West at such places as Carthage, Wilson's Creek, Vicksburg, and Atlanta. According to legend General Bowen's wife smuggled in their first battle flag of this pattern into the Vicksburg seige. It had a blue field bordered in red and a white Latin cross set off-center toward the hoist edge.

The flag was used by all the brigades under Bowen's command. These flags first appeared in February of 1863. A later version was used by the troops of General Sterling Price's army in their 1864 Missouri raid.


3rd Tennessee 1862

3rd Tennessee Hardee Battle Flag
The earliest western Confederate battle flag was flown in Hardee's Corps of the Army of Tennessee. It had been designed by General Simon B. Buckner and first issued to his troops in January of 1862, who were part of the Army of Central Kentucky based in Bowling Green. It first saw action at Ft. Donelson where some of Buckner's Division had been transferred. What remained of the army after this transfer became General William J. Hardee's Corps, which retained the flag.

It's simple design of a blue field and a white center became known as Hardee's Battle Flag. Each Unit's flag were soon inscribed with names of battles they fought in. Later versions had white borders all around.


54th Georgia Volunteers

54th Georgia Infantry Volunteer Hardee Flag 1864
The 54th Georgia Infantry Volunteers were first formed in May of 1862. They were part of General Hugh Mercer's Brigade which had carried Charleston Depot battle flags as part of General William H.T. Walker's Division. Assigned to General Patrick Cleburne's Division in late July, 1864, the brigade finally received their Cleburne/Hardee battle flags after Atlanta's fall, just prior to the Tennessee Campaign.

By 1865, the Southern armies had taken so many casualties that they were consolidating units together to maintain their ability to fight. Two such units, the 4th Battalion Sharpshooters and the 37th Regiment Georgia Infantry were joined together with the 54th Georgia Volunteers Regiment in April of 1865 in North Carolina.


Combined Texas Division

Cleburne's Texas Cavalry (dismounted) Hardee Battle Flag 1864
In November of 1863, the 17th and 18th Texas received their new flannel Hardee flags inscribed with the battle honors of the previous campaigns: Arkansas Post, Chickamauga, Tunnel Hill, and Ringgold Gap. During the Atlanta Campaign, the units participated in some of the hardest fighting of the war. This is the flag of the combined 17th and 18th Texas, it was not issued to the regiment until sometime in early 1864, when the rest of Cleburne's Division got new battle flags.

On July 22, 1864, while fighting in the Confederate front lines, the 18 Texas became cut-off, and nearly surrounded, forcing the surrender of a large number of its men. After a brief hand-to-hand struggle, the battle flag was taken by Union General William T. Clark. After the war, veterans of the 18th Texas made considerable efforts to locate their flag, which in 1914 was returned to Texas by General Clark's widow.


Hart's Battery 1863

Recent speculation has questioned this flags identity, suggesting that it may have belonged to Goode's Battery instead.
Hart’s Battery (Dallas Artillery) 1861-1862
(Second Arkansas Field Battery 1863)


The confusing history of Hart’s Battery started in northwest Arkansas and the Indian Territory where the artillery unit served as part of the Second Brigade of McCulloch’s Division during the winter of 1861-1862. At the two-day Battle of Pea Ridge (Elkhorn Tavern) on March 7-8, 1862, the Yankees captured two of the battery’s guns, along with its colors. For reasons that are still unclear, the battery was then disbanded "for shameful conduct in the presence of the enemy." Apparently cleared of the charges, the battery (or a new one using the same name) was reconstituted in late 1862, just in time to be part of another disaster.
Assigned to Colonel Robert R. Garland’s Texas Brigade at Fort Hindman (Arkansas Post), the battery was again captured with the rest of the garrison when Confederate forces surrendered on January 11, 1863. Although this surrender is also a subject of controversy, from all accounts, Hart’s Battery served their guns professionally and courageously during the siege. After being exchanged in April 1863, Hart's Battery (or a new one using the same name) was once again reconstituted, and possibly spent the remainder of the war in the Trans-Mississippi Army as part of the Second Arkansas Field Battery. There are few references to the name "Hart’s Battery" during the last year of the war.


Jefferson Davis Flag

Arkansas Jeff Davis Flag 1862
This was a battle version of the First Confederate National Flag captured by Union forces at the Battle of Pea Ridge (Elk Horn Tavern) from an unidentified Arkansas brigade. It was made of wool flannel, with the words "Jeff. Davis" worked in black velvet letters.

At the Battle of Pea Ridge, two Confederate flags were taken from the forces of General McCulloch (see Hart's above). This was one of them.


10th Texas Cavalry - 1862

The 10th Texas Cavalry Flag
As part of the Army of the West and later the Army of Tennessee, the 10th Texas was first organized in 1861 as cavalry, but dismounted in 1862, and fought the rest of the war as infantry. As part of McCown's Division they fought at Corinth, Vicksburg, Richmond, Jackson, Chickamauga, and Atlanta before surrendering at Citronelle, Alabama, on May 4, 1865.


Lee's HQ Flag

General Lee's Headquarters (HQ) 1862-1863
General Lee's Headquarters flag, used between June of 1962 and the summer of 1863, has an unusual star arrangement that was believed to have been designed by his wife Mary to reflect the Biblical Arch of the Covenant. According to legend this flag was actually hand-made by Mary Custis and their daughters.

It is currently housed in the collection of the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia.


Polk Battle Flag 1862

The Polk Battle Flag
This was the first version of the famous Polk Battle Flag (13 stars). It was designed by Major-General Leonidas Polk for use by his "1st Grand Division" (corps) of the Army of the Mississippi. Polk had seen how Confederate troops using the CSA First National Flag (the Stars and Bars) could, because of its similarity to the Stars and Stripes, become confused on the battlefield, and decided to design his own that would not be mistaken for an Union flag.


16th Tennessee 1862

16th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment Polk flag
This unit fought at most of the major battles of the Army of Tennessee including Corinth, Mumfordsville, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Franklin, and Nashville. They surrendered to Union forces at Bennett Farm, which today is the City of Durham in Durham County, North Carolina.
They used a second version of the Polk Battle Flag, issued in the summer of 1862, which had a cross edged with white and only 11 stars. The Polk Battle Flag continued in service through 1863.


39th North Carolina 1863

McCown Battle Flag
Major-General John P. McCown was appointed to command of a division of the Confederate Army of the West in March of 1862. His troops, organized in two brigades, came from Texas and Arkansas. McCown was of Scottish descent, which probably explains the design of his battle flag for his division: Scotland's Cross of St. Andrew, a white saltire on a blue field.

This particular flag is that of the 39th North Carolina. The other remaining flags of this pattern have no red corners. This flag was probably issued to the Army of Kentucky in addition to McCown's Division.


Van Dorn Flag 1862

4th Missouri Infantry Regiment
When General Earl Van Dorn was assigned a Corps in the Army of the West in the trans-Mississippi theater, he personally designed this type flag for his command. Known as a "Van Dorn flag," it saw use until after the fall of Vicksburg in the west.

When General Van Dorn became Commander of the Army of the West in 1862 his flag came with him. Arriving too late to fight at Shiloh, Van Dorn's troops began adopting this flag in June, with the first issues (with slightly different star pattern and fringed edges) going to the Missouri Brigade. In August, the rest of the army received these flags which first saw use at Iuka and Corinth where some examples were captured. The crescent is taken from the Missouri state Coat of Arms was was designed to inspire Missouri troops as they crossed east of the Mississippi River.


Choctaw Brigade Flag

1st Choctaw Battalion Cavalry 1863
About 200 Choctaw braves enlisted in the Confederate service early in 1863, under the command of Major Pearce, and soon afterward found themselves in a disastrous engagement with Union soldiers at Tangipahoe. They flew this distinct banner which features the native weapons of the Choctaw tribe. Many of the Indians and several of the white officers were captured at the battle and some of the Indians were taken North and put on exhibition. This put an end to the battalion as a formal organization, but some of the Choctaws later became dismounted scouts in Spann's Battalion of Independent Scouts.


Cherokee Mounted Rifles

Second Cherokee Mounted Rifles 1862
This flag was the first National Flag ever carried by the Cherokee Nation. When the South commissioned Cherokee Indian Stand Watie a colonel in 1861, it began a military career that eventual allowed Watie to became one of only two native Americans on either side to ever become a general. His light calvary command participated in 27 major engagements and numerous smaller skirmishes. Most of their activities utilized guerrilla warfare tactics and Watie's men launched raids throughout the northern-held Indian Territory, Kansas and Missouri. He is credited with tying down thousands of Union troops. Watie was promoted to brigadier general in 1864. On June 23, 1865, he became the last Confederate general to surrender at the end of the war.


Annie Fickle´s Flag


Quantrill´s Raiders
modern fantasty flag
Quantrill´s Raiders 1862-1865
Quantrill´s Raiders were a loosely organized force of Confederate raiders who fought in the American Civil War under the leadership of William Clarke Quantrill. He and his men ambushed Union patrols and supply convoys, seized the mail, and occasionally struck towns on either side of the Kansas-Missouri border. The name "Quantrill´s Raiders" seems to have been attached to them long after the war, when the veterans would hold reunions. The same thing can be said about their flag.
According to local legend, Annie Fickle of Lafeyette County presented a battle flag to Quantrill´s men in thanks for helping her get out of a Yankee prison where she was being held for aiding the enemy. In red letters, she stitched the name "Quantrell," a misspelling, on a plain black flag. The raiders appreciated her gift and carried the standard into several battles. Although Quantrill was killed in Kentucky in 1865, his "legacy" would live on, when many of his men continued on as outlaws after the Civil War. Under the leadership of Frank James, the "James-Younger Gang," would be an example.


Bath County Volunteers

Bath County Volunteers (Virginia) 1861-65
This is a company battle flag for a company of Confederate infantry raised in Bath County, Virginia. It saw service all through the war, and which was presented by the ladies of Bath County.

The flag is made of fine blue silk with a series of ornate, white scrolls in the center. At the top of the flag it reads "Presented by the Ladies of Bath," and at the bottom reads "God Protect the Right."


10th Tennessee Flag

10th Tennessee Irish Infantry Brigade
The unlucky 10th Tennessee Infantry was organized in 1861, just a few weeks after the first shot was fired at Fort Sumpter. The "Sons of Erin's" motto was "Go where Glory Waits You." At the fighting at Fort Donelson the 10th Tennessee suffered severe losses and earned the nickname of "The Bloody Tenth." After the surrender of Fort Donelson, the field and staff officers were taken as prisoners of war, moved to Fort Warren and Camp Douglas where they received cruel treatment, but were eventually exchanged in 1862. The reunited 10th Brigade was then ordered to Vicksburg where they suffered another bloody defeat at the Battle of Chickasaw Bayou. They continued to fight for the losing cause until the end of the war. There were less than 100 men left in the 10th Tennessee Infantry at the closing of the war, and every one of them had been wounded, many times.


California Confederate Flag

The J.P. Gillis Flag 1861
During the first year of the Civil War, this flag was captured in Sacramento, California. The creator was a Major J.P. Gillis, who flew the flag on the 4th of July, 1861. Major Gillis claimed he was celebrating the independence of the United States from Britain as well as the southern states from the Union. He unfurled his Confederate flag and proceeded to march down the main street of Sacramento to delight of the onlookers. The flag was of his own design and the canton contains seventeen stars rather than the Confederate's seven.

Because the flag was "captured" by Jack Biderman and Curtis Clark, who were enraged by Gillis' actions, the flag is often also referred to as the "Biderman Flag." Poor Clark, nobody ever refered to the flag as "The Clark Flag," except here.


South Carolina Sovereign Flag

South Carolina Sovereignty Flag 1860
This is a version of an early flag raised over South Carolina shortly after its secession from the Union in 1860 (it was also supposed to have been raised over Yale University by sympathizers).

It is called the South Carolina Sovereignty Flag and was supposed to have been an inspiration for the Confederate flag in its later form.


The Citadel´s "Big Red"

The Citadel Battery Flag 1861
In early 1861, after South Carolina seceded from the United States, her military forces took possession of all military installations around Charleston harbor, except Fort Sumter. One of the smaller installations, or batteries, was manned by cadets from the South Carolina Military Institute, also known as "The Citadel." The flag flown over the battery manned by the Citadel cadets was a red field with the palmetto and crescent. These cadets had the distinction of having actually fired the first shots in what was to become the war. They fired warning shots at the steamer "Star of the West," which had been despatched by U.S. President Buchanan to supply the garrison at Fort Sumter. The "Star of the West" turned back, avoided the opening of hostilities at that point in time. The red flag with the palmetto tree and crescent has since been considered an unofficial flag of The Citadel Military Institute. It is affectionately known as "Big Red."


Louisiana Confederate Flag

Confederate State of Louisiana Flag 1861-1865
This flag of Louisiana was adopted in 1861. Although it is sometimes referred to as the flag of the Republic of Louisiana, this is not accurate, because this was actually the flag of Louisiana as a Confederate State. Louisiana has always been proud of its Spanish and French heritage. Although the flag is obviously based on the design of the U.S. Flag with a square canton and 13 stripes, the canton is colored red with a single yellow star honoring the colors of the Spanish flag, and the stripes of blue, white, and red honored the colors of the French flag.


Mississippi Confederate Flag

Confederate State of Mississippi Flag 1861-1865
The official flag of Mississippi during the War for Southern Independence was a white flag with a magnolia tree in natural colors. The canton was blue and had a single white star. The fly was a thin red bar extending vertically the length of the flag; sometimes it included red fringe as well. The flag was so popular Mississippi became known as the "Magnolia State." This remained as the state flag until 1894 when the present flag was adopted.

This flag was also used by the 3rd Mississippi Infantry as a regimental flag


North Carolina Confederate

Confederate State of North Carolina Flag 1861-1865
The first ten regiments of North Carolina Volunteer Troops (Later renamed the 11th through 20th North Carolina regiments) received this silk state flag made in Norfolk, Virginia by a private contractor. Later, in 1862, the state provided these regiments wool and cotton versions of the state flag made in Raleigh.

The only other Confederate state that made such an effort to issue state flags, was Virginia. Virginia issued state flags from 1861 into 1865 for her regiments.


Palmetto Guard Flag

Company C, South Carolina 18th Artillery Battalion
Company C was part of the South Carolina 18th Heavy Artillery Battalion, also called the "Siege Train Artillery Battalion" and the "Palmetto Guard," The 18th was organized in 1862 with three companies in Charleston, South Carolina.
The Guard fought at Fort Sumter, Grimball's Landing, Battery Wagner, James Island, and John's Island. In 1864, Company C was transferred to Pegram's Battalion of Artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia and fought its last battle as artillery at the Petersburg. What remained after the Petersburg siege, served as infantry in the Army of Tennessee, which surrendered in April of 1865.

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"Put the Vermonters ahead and keep the column well close"
General John "Uncle" Sedgwick
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polecat
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intérêt(s) pour la CW: uniformologie

PostPosted: Tue 18 May - 11:58 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote





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Captain Nathan BRITTLES
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PostPosted: Wed 19 May - 15:30 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

Simpa tout ça !!!!!

Merci Walker.
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PostPosted: Thu 2 Sep - 14:32 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

bonjour les pros de la cw il me faudrai les dimensions du guidon cavalerie rouge & blanc (en cm svp)  merci ssss
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ccffpa
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intérêt(s) pour la CW: tout !

PostPosted: Thu 2 Sep - 15:35 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

longueur 102,5 cm
longueur de la partie en creux 37,5 cm
hauteur 67,5 cm
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la bonne cause ? c'est celle pour laquelle on se bat !
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mcouioui
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intérêt(s) pour la CW: l'Histoire vivante, l'immersion...

PostPosted: Thu 2 Sep - 16:57 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

Réponse aussi directe que la question...
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Maman je t'aime!
In memory of Steve Boulton...
Live the little story, lost in the history...
French Volunteers and French Mess, two groups, same passion, same family!

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Rollingblock4570
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PostPosted: Thu 2 Sep - 17:38 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

joli tout ces drapeaux. que de couleurs de formes et d'histoire.
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PostPosted: Fri 3 Sep - 22:31 (2010)    Post subject: Guidon de cavalerie Reply with quote

merci commandant renseignement tres utiles pour faire une  replique   a je vais jouer au cow boy le week end prochain  (non historique) mais les gosses adore   apres on leur esplique la realite         a plus
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